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Annual conferences of the Haitian FMC

  -October 23rd, 2012 @ 6:15 am

Annual conferences of the Haitian FMC will be convened at various times through the months of October, November and December. Pray conference participants will have discernment and business, and conference elections will run smoothly. Pray for both Rick Ireland and who will be attending.

Rick Reflects

  -October 25th, 2011 @ 6:55 pm

As a missionary, one has feet in two different worlds. When I left my world of origin (Western New York) and moved to , I had a great deal to both learn and to unlearn. I am learning a new language. I have had to learn to drive as driving here in is a completely different experience than in the US. I could go on but I suspect you don’t have too much trouble coming up with things one might have to learn when one moves to a different country. It didn’t surprise me that I had new things to learn. What has surprised me is how much I have had to unlearn. I have had to unlearn that water is freely available and safe to drink. I have to keep a jug of “safe” water in my bathroom to rinse my toothbrush. I have had to unlearn that electricity is a given. Between learning to use an inverter, checking the water in my battery bank, and maintaining my generator for those frequent times that the municipal electric isn’t working, I spend hours a week just to ensure I have something I never had to think much about in my old world. I have had to unlearn that the safety of my food supply is mostly a given. I have had to unlearn that a quick trip to Walmart will supply me with most anything I might need. There is not a Walmart or even a McDonalds in the entire country of that I am aware of. A quick trip? Not.

This past summer Cookie and I spent several months in the US visiting our supporting churches. It seemed odd to leave this world (Haiti) and re-enter that one. It sure made me appreciate how blessed we in the US really are. It also made me very aware that I have my feet in two different worlds in a way that I had not really thought of before. Then I thought further and I realized that living with one’s feet in two different worlds was not a new experience after all. I invited Jesus into my world (or perhaps more correctly I entered His) at the ripe old age of 27. I had a lot to learn. Before that “grace” was a quick prayer some people said before they ate. I used to think that was kind of odd. Now grace means something very different. I have learned a lot of new words as a Christian. I learned a new way to spend Sundays. I learned a new way to treat the people in my world. The Bible has become more than a dusty book on my bookshelf. I had some things to unlearn as well. My language could be pretty “salty”. It has been a lifetime struggle to move from being “self centered” to “Christ centered”. I am still working on that one; it’s a lifetime journey.

Hebrews 11 celebrates the lives of heroes of the faith. It makes this observation:
All these people were still living by faith when they died. They did not receive the things promised; they only saw them and welcomed them from a distance. And they admitted that they were aliens and strangers on earth. People who say such things show that they are looking for a country of their own. If they had been thinking of the country they had left, they would have had opportunity to return. Instead, they were longing for a better country-a heavenly one Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for he has prepared a city for them. (Hebrews 11:13-16, NIV)

Did you get that? They were and we are “aliens and strangers”. The point is simple and basic: as Christians we walk with one foot in this world and one foot in His world. As we allow God to reshape us from what we were and are into what He has designed us to be, we have things to learn and things to unlearn. God is watching us with more than a passing interest. How is it going? Rick

 

Cookie and I are supported in our work in Haiti by people like you. If you would like to be a part of our team and support us financially or prayerfully (both are needed) go to our website at www.servinghaiti.com where you will find links under the “Join Us” tab.

A Day of Remembering

  -January 12th, 2011 @ 7:29 am

Rick Ireland
4 a.m., January 12, 2011

I can’t sleep. I have gotten up, dressed, fired up the coffee pot and am sitting here at my computer, well … reflecting. Last night, even Haitians that have repaired and/or rebuilt their homes (there are many) slept outside. A rumor has been going around that a second earthquake will hit on this anniversary of the first one. For Haitians it has been a year of loss. They have lost family members, homes and jobs. It has been a year of putting their lives back together. Today, a holiday has been declared, and churches all over the country will have special services.

In a few hours, I will attend a special service at the site of the collapsed guest house. The spouses of all those who died a year ago will be there. from World Missions will lead a special service. We will remember, and there is a lot to remember.

One year ago, I was the pastor of the just north of Buffalo, NY. I had begun to prepare for being a missionary to but didn’t expect to get there for another year. Shortly after the earthquake hit the news, my daughter Kate called. She was engaged to be married to Been Valcin, a Haitian who lived in . Somehow he had managed to get a brief phone call out so we knew he and his family had survived. We didn’t hear anything more for ten days. Two weeks later, I was on a plane to the Dominican Republic. From there I drove into with a small advance team. The stench of death was everywhere. I had been given the task of working alongside the Haitian national leaders in relief and recovery, and in putting the mission operation back together. And over the last year, that is what we have done.

In almost 30 locations, Free Methodist schools and churches were damaged or destroyed. Most people of Port-au-Prince (2.5 million people) were living in tents, at best. The most recent estimates are that a million people are still in tents. We have made substantial progress, but there is still a long way to go. A full recovery is years away. But as I look back, I see a lot has been done. In the early days, we had food distributions in all our earthquake-impacted churches. We had special programming for the children. We organized free medical clinics conducted by Haitian doctors and nurses. We provided for temporary housing for our pastors. One year later, our focus is rebuilding. In those locations where buildings could be repaired, they have been repaired. We have managed to get decent temporary structures in those locations that lost everything. We have provided training for pastors and builders to know how to build earthquake-resistant structures, and they have repaired and rebuilt using what they learned.

As I look at the state of the church here in Haiti, I am filled with hope. The last three Sundays I have been in three different churches. One was a permanent building that survived the quake, and two were temporary structures designed for 1,000 or more to attend. None of them were big enough to contain the people who showed up. God is moving across the face of Haiti, and it is a privilege to be here and watch.

Dale Woods
January 12, 2011

I sit at the FOHO complex as I write. Just down the street, the largest Free Methodist church in Haiti began services at 6 a.m. The services will last all day. I can hear the people worship. They are not sad. They are not defeated. They do not mourn. Instead, I hear joyous singing. Shouts of “Hallelujah!” Church overflowing. The church being the church in times of great struggle and great opportunity.

Yes, as I have been in Haiti, I have seen the U.S. headlines on the internet. “Haiti Still in Crisis.” “Haiti Struggles to Rebuild.” Many sound bites, many authors. I can only report what I see in Haiti. I think my headline would be: “Progress and Accomplishment.” The nation has changed and progressed. It is amazing what has happened in the last year. Much, much progress. Personally, I cannot believe how much has been accomplished from one year ago. Yes, much still needs to be done – the task is huge.

Yes, people still live in tents. But, fewer people than a year ago. Rubble is being cleared; houses are being built; people are working; and students are going to school. The nation faces many challenges, but there is great hope.

I am proud of the church. I am proud of the Free Methodist Church and our partner organizations in Haiti. Sunday we worshiped at Puit Blain, a church that was overflowing, as many churches are today in Haiti. I was able to participate in an infant dedication. The pastor told me the stories of the mothers and fathers coming to Christ after the earthquake, and now, a year later bringing their children to be dedicated. Yes, many of our churches are in temporary structures like the one you see here. On Sunday we worshiped under tarps – all 1,500 of us! We worshiped in tarps; however, all of us could look out and see the new church being constructed – again, great hope for the future.

Perhaps you have heard stories of aid organizations not spending relief money. This is not true of the Free Methodist Church. According to missionary Rick Ireland, 95% of the relief money has been distributed. Medicine. Tents. Water. Wells. Schools. Churches. Houses. Thank you for making a difference in Haiti!

In a few minutes, all the families of those who died in the will gather at the grave site. Haitians and Americans, united in hope and anticipation of what God will do tomorrow in Haiti. This will not be a service of grief, but of anticipation for what God will do in the future.

Thanks for praying. Thanks for giving. And, thank you for your willingness to continue support of an amazing movement of God in Haiti!

Report from Rick Ireland

  -January 11th, 2011 @ 8:39 pm

Three Sundays ago, I worshiped at Faustin 1st Free Methodist. They are in a temporary church built for about 1,200. It isn’t big enough. Two Sundays ago, I worshiped at Parc Chretien Church. It can seat about 2,000. People were standing in the courtyard. This past Sunday, I worshiped at Puit Blain. This temporary church can seat 1,000. They, too, have outgrown their space. All three of these churches have grown substantially over the past year. In the midst of the chaos, God is at work

PBS program “Religion and Ethics.”
The video includes interviews with Rick Ireland and , as well as footage of Parc Chretien and Greffen FM churches.

Watch the full episode. See more Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.

Tropical Storm Tomas

  -November 2nd, 2010 @ 7:43 am

Reuters News Service reported yesterday that government officials and aid partners in earthquake and cholera ravaged are endeavoring to prepare crowded quake survivor camps and coastal towns for a possible hit by a later this week. Tropical Storm Tomas, which is heading westward across the eastern Caribbean sea, is expected to turn north towards Haiti and the Dominican Republic by the end of the week, and restrengthen as a , the U.S. National Center said.

Rick Ireland wrote Mon., Nov. 1: “We are closely watching weather reports. Please pray that the course of this storm will change! We dread the possibility of winds and heavy rains in the tent cities.”

Haiti: Cholera Outbreak: Update from Rick Ireland, Oct. 29

  -October 29th, 2010 @ 3:37 pm

“Last Sunday and I called back into action the health team, which we had put together in the early phases of the earthquake, to respond to the cholera epidemic. This is a Haitian team consisting of two doctors, several nurses, and some community organizers, about a dozen all told. The team has been spending this week in the Dessalines area. The medical people are helping the staff at the DRHP (Dessalines Rural Health Program). We have had 50,000 fliers printed up and the community mobilizer part of the team is traveling the region, working through the local churches to educate people how to protect themselves and how to respond with early symptoms of the disease. In addition to the fliers, we purchased medicine based on a list provided by Dr. , as well as bleach and hand cleaner for distribution.”

Specific prayer requests from Rick and : “Please pray that this epidemic will be stopped, that there will be no more deaths, that needed personnel and supplies will reach those affected. Pray for continued strength for the Haitian people as they face yet another crisis.”

Free Methodist Church Emergency Response Team Report – August 2010

  -August 11th, 2010 @ 8:34 am

July 12 was the six-month anniversary of what has been described as the greatest natural disaster in recorded history. A major metropolitan area (Port- au-Prince is home to one- fourth of ’s population) was hit by a major earthquake. The response of the Free Methodist Church was immediate and generous. Over $1.6 million has been received from churches in the United States, Canada, the Dominican Republic and around the world. To date, more than a mil lion of that has been distributed.

The full report can be reviewed in PDF format HERE.

Relationships: Haiti

  -July 27th, 2010 @ 6:52 am

Relationships are crucial to partnerships. Consider this example from missionary Rick Ireland involving two U.S. teams (from The Journey , CO, and , NY) that worked alongside Haitians to rebuild after the earthquake: “The church at is in a poor community, but each day they fed the U.S. teams both breakfast and lunch. Though it was a real financial sacrifice for this Haitian church, it didn’t stop them from ministering to the people who were ministering to them. If their U.S. brothers and sisters were willing to sacrifice money, time and comfort to help them, they were going to return it as best they could. Each Sunday the U.S. teams drove to for worship. Both teams reported that God showed up in a big way.” Does the prospect of relationships like this stir something in you? Contact (Dale4Missions@gmail.com or 810-836-6527) to discover how you can be involved.

Haitian Pastor David Charles

  -June 1st, 2010 @ 7:51 am

Funeral services for Haitian , who was murdered Wednesday, May 26, will be held Saturday, June 5. As Pastor Charles was leaving a bank after cashing a check, two motorcycle robbers accosted him to steal his money (and perhaps kidnap him). While the robbery was taking place, a security guard stepped into view. The robbers panicked, shot the guard and Pastor Charles, killing them both, and then fled. Pastor Charles was the legal representative for the Annual Conference.

Missionary Rick Ireland Reflects May 29, 2010

Every Thursday at noon, a group of Free Methodist Haitian pastors gathers in the office of the General Superintendent for a time of worship and prayer. I happened be there as they gathered this week. The mood was somber. The day before, a prominent and beloved pastor had been robbed and killed as he left his bank after withdrawing some money to replace his car. The murdered pastor’s son was among those who slowly and quietly filed in. Each greeted the grieving son. Someone handed out hymnals and one of the pastors led out the singing, marking time with the snap of his fingers. The first song was slow and sad. A pastor prayed. The second song was a bit more upbeat. Another pastor prayed. And so the pattern continued. At one point, a pastor opened his Bible and began to preach. I couldn’t understand all the words but the name “Job” figured prominently. More singing and praying followed. And though I did not understand all the words (except the ones I was asked to share), I did watch in wonder as God filled that space, lifting people up in a difficult time. By the end of the meeting, even the grieving son was singing these songs of faith. As the impromptu service wound down, there was still sadness but there was also quiet resolution. These pastors did not face the future alone. They have one another, and they have a God who is bigger than their suffering, and who understands their suffering, sharing the journey.

Our faith doesn’t exempt us from suffering. What I could see first hand is that what faith does do is give us the resources to face the suffering that is part of life in a fallen world. We do not serve a God who is watching a show from a distance. We serve a God who took on the very flesh of man, experienced life in its joy and sorrow, in its victory and its suffering – a God who understands the pain of grieving over a much too early death. There is a strength in that and I saw it in the faces of the men as they left that day.

In 2 Corinthians 1:3-5 (NIV) we read:
Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves have received from God. For just as the sufferings of Christ flow over into our lives, so also through Christ our comfort overflows.

I saw that lived out in the in the flesh this week. These pastors are no strangers to suffering. They have lived through floods, political upheaval, and now earthquakes. Everyone of them lost people close to them on January 12. They knew the pain of the grieving son, but they knew the Son who saw them though the suffering of the past would be there in this as well.

I knew the pastor who died. I will miss his quiet gentle spirit and his words of encouragement as I adapt to life in this very different place. I am strong in the reality that this time of separation is not permanent. We will meet again.

Haiti Pastor Murdered

  -May 26th, 2010 @ 6:00 pm

Free Methodist World Missions received the following report from Rick Ireland at approximately 6:00 p.m. today, Wed., May 26:

About two hours ago Haitian was murdered in . He was secretary of the Annual Conference. This death will have a big impact on the national leadership team. The circumstances, as we currently understand them, are that as Pastor Charles was leaving the bank after cashing a check, two motorcycle robbers accosted him to steal his money (and perhaps kidnap him). While the robbery was taking place, a security guard stepped into view. The robbers panicked, shot the guard and Pastor Charles, killing them both, and then fled.

More details will be released as they are available.